Road to Refuge coffee cups return to share the untold stories of hope in Australia’s refugee community for Refugee Week

Road to Refuge is partnering with cafes across Melbourne to encourage customers to consider the perspectives, voices and lived experiences of refugees when they purchase a coffee.

From the 19th June to 25th June, customers across Melbourne will find that their local café will be sharing Layla’s story of struggle and courage on their coffee cup for the Coffee Cup Project. While Layla is fictional, her story is more common than Australians think.

This year though, the cups are back with a different message.

IMG_7513[1]

“You never hear the stories about the dignity and strength of people seeking asylum in the refugee debate,” says Road to Refuge Director Sam Butcher.

“Our coffee cups are kickstarters for deeper engagement with Australia’s treatment of refugees, regardless of how you vote at the ballot box,” says Coffee Cup Project Co-ordinator Alexandra Chlebowski.

“We’re encouraging everyone who grabs our cups to come to our exhibition: Stories About Hope and see the untold stories of Australia’s refugee community from the people who live them.”

Stories About Hope will be held at the No Vacancy Project Space, the Atrium, Fed Square celebrating the dignity, identities, and strength in people from refugee backgrounds. The exhibition is on from June 20th to June 25th daily from 11am – 5pm. For more information visit storiesabouthope.com.au

Road to Refuge is proud to be partnering with some of Melbourne’s best cafes, including coffee powerhouses Seven Seeds and Market Lane Coffees. Visit your local cafe listed below and grab a #CoffeeWithLayla during Refugee Week.

IMG_7509[1]

About Road to Refuge:

Road to Refuge is a not-for-profit community organisation building a new conversation which supports and values the lived experience and dignity of people seeking asylum. Road to Refuge runs engaging and creative community events, educational initiatives and workshops alongside their interactive web-program. 

You can follow us on social media through our Twitter, Instagram and Facebook page.

Or you can head to our website and subscribe to the mailing list.

Participating Cafes List (14/6/2017):

  • Long Street Cafe, Richmond
  • Traveller, CBD
  • Hortus, Docklands
  • Brother Baba Budan, CBD
  • Seven Seeds, Carlton
  • Ho Ho’s Canteen, The University of Melbourne
  • Milkwood, Brunswick East
  • Armstrong Street Milkbar, Middle Park
  • Social Studio / The Cutting Table Cafe, Collingwood
  • Auction Rooms & Corner Cafe, North Melbourne
  • Market Lane Prahran Market
  • Market Lane Queen Victoria Market
  • Market Lane Therry Street
  • Market Lane Carlton
  • Market Lane Collins St
  • Everyday Coffee Collingwood
  • Everyday Coffee Midtown CBD
  • All Are Welcome Bakery Northcote
  • Cafe Tre Sette, Carlton
  • The Skylark Room, Upwey
  • Mile End Bagels, Fitzroy
  • Assembly, Carlton
  • Gravity Work Space CBD
  • STREAT Melbourne Central, CBD
  • STREAT McKillop St, CBD
Road to Refuge coffee cups return to share the untold stories of hope in Australia’s refugee community for Refugee Week

Have a #CoffeeWithLayla

Following last years success, Road to Refuge will be running our Coffee Cup Project  again this year to celebrate Refugee Week from June 19.

FB-3

During this week, cafes across Melbourne  be swapping their usual coffee cups for ones stamped with an image of Layla, one of Road to Refuge’s journey characters, to encourage customers to consider the journeys of people seeking asylum and refugees who have shaped Australia. Layla’s story is one of struggle and courage. While Layla’s character is fictional, the journey of many others in her position is not.

Coffee drinkers are invited to share a #coffeewithlayla and place themselves in the position of a person seeking safety by taking an interactive journey on Road to Refuge’s website. By sharing images of their coffee cups with the hashtag #coffeewithlayla, Melburnians will be a part of a wider campaign to raise awareness and engagement about issues facing people seeking asylum and refugees.

Project co-ordinator James Hickey, who has worked with social enterprises and cafes across Melbourne through his work with Scarf and Kinfolk, says the Refugee Week Coffee Cup Project will encourage members of the public, whether already passionate about these issues, non-committed or just wanting to engage more in a constructive dialogue; providing a chance to kickstart this engagement.

“Although the concept of the project is quite simple, encouraging people to educate themselves further on the realities of seeking asylum, and providing them with the means to do so, is an extremely powerful tool. Creating opportunities for more informed, dynamic discussions is immeasurable.”

Road to Refuge is proud to be partnering with some of Melbourne’s best cafes across both sides of the river, including coffee powerhouse Seven Seeds at all four of their cafes, with many cafes choosing to participate in the project for a second year. Visit your local cafe listed below and grab a #coffeewithlayla during Refugee Week.

We’d also love to to say a big thank you to BioPak, who jumped on board to support the project the minute they heard about it, offering a generous discount to help us get this project off teh ground and reach out to more people in the community through cafe participation.

And a special shout out to Lulu Cafe and Gallery in North Melbourne for hosting our launch party, and their generous support for the project!

CBD

  • Brother Baba Budan, Little Bourke Street

  • Good 2 Go, Hosier Lane

  • Hortus, Docklands

  • Kinfolk Cafe, Bourke Street

  • Sun Moth Canteen & Bar, Niagara Lane

  • Traveller, Crossley Street

Inner North

  • Addict, Fitzroy

  • Arkwright & Co, Carlton North

  • Assembly Coffee, Carlton

  • Auction Rooms, North Melbourne

  • Burnside, Fitzroy

  • Cafe Bu, Carlton North
  • Counter, North Melbourne

  • Everyday, Collingwood

  • De Clieu, Fitzroy

  • Friends of the Earth, Collingwood

  • Green Park Dining, Carlton North

  • Long Street Coffee, Richmond

  • Lulu Cafe & Gallery, North Melbourne

  • Newtown Specialty Coffee, Fitzroy

  • North Cafeteria, North Carlton

  • Seven Seeds, North Melbourne

  • Sir Charles, Fitzroy

  • Slowpoke Espresso, Fitzroy

  • Stagger Lees, Fitzroy

  • Twenty and Six Espresso, North Melbourne

Northern Suburbs

  • East Elevation, Brunswick

  • Lux Foundry, Brunswick

  • Milkwood, Brunswick East

  • Mixed Business, Fitzroy North

  • Pachamama, Brunswick

  • Phat Milk, Travancore

  • So & So, Travancore

  • Uncle Drew, Clifton Hill

  • Wide Open Road, Brunswick

Southside

  • Brighton Schoolhouse, Brighton

  • Coffee on Kareela, Frankston

Regional

  • Friar’s Street Food Store, Shepparton

  • Black Sheep Cafe, Corryong

Have a #CoffeeWithLayla

Dana’s picks for the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival

I go to the Human Rights and Arts Film Festival every year. It’s a fantastic opportunity to learn more about human rights issues across the world and at home. It’s also a chance for me to reflect more deeply about human rights issues I think that I might already be across, like the way that refugees and people seeking asylum experience the world, in their struggle for safety.

This year HRAFF have really made an effort to highlight the experience of seeking asylum and what it means to be a refugee today in Australia and abroad.

So this year it’s your chance to get a new perspective about what it is to seek asylum or to deepen your understanding of it through the unique and moving lens of documentary film and the arts.

Make sure you get along to at least one of these:

Chasing Asylum

Chasing Asylum is a disruptive and subversive documentary that cracks open the detention centres on Manus Island and Nauru to shine the light in. With never before seen footage and heartbreaking and challenging interviews by whitsleblowers and refugees on those islands – this film will shock you. Highly recommended viewing for everyone – whether you work closely in this area or are a supporter of refugee rights from afar. Chasing Asylum is an important antidote to the government’s 1984 rhetoric and information black hole.

Chasing Asylum opened the festival to a sold-out crowd Thursday  night, but screens again on May 8. Not to be missed.

Dreaming of Denmark

Dreaming of Denmark, showing on Saturday, follows Wasiullah, who fled Afghanistan at just 15 years old. This film investigates what happens to the many refugee children who disappear from asylum centres year after year, providing brutally honest depictions of the transience, isolation and frightening uncertainty they face.

They Will Have to Kill Us First

After taking control of Northern Mali in 2012, Islamist extremists implemented a law banning all forms of music, effectively cutting off the lifeblood of Malian culture. Radio stations were demolished, instruments were destroyed and musicians faced torture, exile or death. Grab a spot to the Monday screening.

Rituals of Belonging

Rituals Of Belonging exhibition, running from May 10 to May 15, showcases an immersive visual, sound and performance experience from Australian contemporary artists and refugee perspectives.

Stories from Detention

On May 11, at Longplay, Behind the Wire (behindthewire.org.au) will play three stories of detention told to you by Mohammad, Donna and ‘Peter’ about their experiences of detention. This is a space where the voices of people who have been detained by the government are amplified and the white noise of Parliament and the media is turned off. There are two limited sessions, don’t miss out.

HRAFF Goes West

HRAFF Goes West is an afternoon of entertainment and discussion, showcasing the stories of our newest Australians and celebrating their cultural and creative contribution. The event kicks off with a rhythmic, cross-cultural performance by the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre’s Music Group, followed by a selection of short films from the Festival’s 2016 line-up and  a panel discussion. This is a free event but you have to RSVP!

A Walnut Tree

A Walnut Tree is a film set in a Pakistani refugee camp. The film allows us to witness life from through Baba’s eyes, and by proxy, the experiences of many other displaced people around the globe today. This film will show on Saturday May 14

Quote

Road to Refuge volunteer Emma Costa shares her new favourite cookbook

Yesterday I was introduced to the truly special cookbook, A Taste From Home, whose recipes are shared by refugees living in Malaysia. It was written by Haris Coussidis in partnership with UNHCR Malaysia with the understanding that food is both a way in which people can come together and a way in which people can maintain a connection to their culture and identity.

The book’s recipes are organised by home countries of the 17 contributing refugees which are Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Palestine, Syria, Irag, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Myanmar.

What makes the cookbook most special is that before each recipe, readers learn the significance of the dish to its contributor which is sensitively and honestly intertwined with stories from their refugee experience.

For example, Helena Asefa, who discusses that learning to make doro wat (chicken stew) is a rite of passage dish in her home country Ethopia, and that she will soon share it with her family who she has not seen in four years when she is resettled with them in Australia.

Common to each story was the idea that food enabled them to feel close to home. These stories were also accompanied by poignant photographs by author and photographer Haris Coussidis , who says she aims to put human face to refugee issues in Malaysia.

I also found it so beautiful that Haris was able to produce the book by being welcomed into the kitchens of each of the refugees who feature in it. For me, their generosity and openness to others really contrasted with their descriptions of having felt unwelcome upon arriving in Malaysia, and what we can witness transpiring the world over.

It really highlighted the ways in which people come together over food to share experiences and listen.

Of course, on top of the beauty of the book itself, I haven’t even mentioned the incredible recipes including Ouzi (Syrian stuffed filo pockets with spiced mints and nut), Tennai sambol (Sri Lanan coconut sambal), and anjero (Somali flatbread), which themselves stand alone as an incredible reason to check out the book.

A Taste From Home is such an incredible way for people to hear the stories of refugees through relating to a shared passion for food. I am looking forward to eating, learning, and sharing with others from it

Fardous, one of the contributors the book, making M'sakhan djaaj
Fardous, one of the contributors the book, making M’sakhan djaaj
Haris A Taste From Home
A Taste From Home”
Quote